zeldathemes
scigrrrl

Welcome to the blog extension of the scigrrrl zine series! This blog (and the zine) includes everything under the umbrella of feminist science studies (aka where my love for both feminism and science intersects). Feedback, constructive criticism, and questions are greatly appreciated!

thatssoscience:

NEW VIDEO

I count down my top five favorite ladies representing STEM in movies and T.V. while I discuss the implications of “The Dana Scully Effect”! 

brainsx:

hey guys, check out these kick-ass lab shoes I bought myself! they come in red and gray.

WANT THESE! LOVE IT!

Got an email from my work today! September is officially women in science and medicine month! two Brilliant female scientist presenting at grand rounds and about being women in the field - I am beyond ecstatic and excited. LOVE WHERE I WORK! 

  #women in science and medicine    #good decisions    #love my job  

astro-feminist:

An article written by my undergraduate research advisor/mentor. Check it out.

quasi-normalcy:

christel-thoughts:

from 2012, here’s the actual article

All participants received the same materials, which were randomly assigned either the name of a male (n = 63) or a female (n = 64) student; student gender was thus the only variable that differed between conditions.”

assessed: (i) perceived student competence; (ii) salary offers, which reflect the extent to which a student is valued for these competitive positions; and (iii) the extent to which the student was viewed as deserving of faculty mentoring…In each case, the effect of student gender was significant (all P < 0.01), whereas the effect of faculty participant gender and their interaction was not (all P > 0.19).

plain english: female students are discriminated against in science simply for being women… by male AND female faculty.. in every measure assessed.

Now that unconscious sexism among scientists is an empirically demonstrated fact, scientists have no basis for denying its existence.

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.
The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so evolution has come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.

The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so evolution has come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

Just read this interesting article that suggests that women fare better when “manning-up” in job interviews. Kind of upsetting but may be a reality - any thoughts?

  #manning up    #women    #jobs  

In April I asked a group of sixth graders from Beaufort Middle School in North Carolina, “Do I look like a scientist to you?”

A young boy sitting in the corner of the room loudly answered, “Uh, yeah. Why not?”

I visited this particular middle school as part of the North Carolina Science Festival's Invite-a-Scientist (IAS) Program. The IAS program targets middle-school students and aims to get a diverse array of scientists into the classroom talking about their science and their story and incorporating hands-on activities whenever possible. In 2014 the 55 different scientists involved in Invite-a-Scientist reached 4,500 students across the state of North Carolina. More than half these students' classes (65 percent) had never had an expert visit before Invite-a-Scientist. One Appalachian State University professor in geology had the students collect dust samples from their school in advance, ran them through a scanning electron microscope, and then helped the students identify what was in that sample during the classroom visit.

The IAS program isn’t limited to targeting girls in middle school, or to female experts, but an impressive statistic about the set of experts is that 37 of these experts were women. One teacher set up a lunch-and-learn with the female expert for her female students, so that they could talk more in depth with her. Why didn’t I think of that?

I always tell my students that one of the most important pieces of the Invite-a-Scientist program is exposing them to scientists who don’t fit the “Einstein mold.” And what can this type of exposure to a diverse set of scientists, or even a diverse set of examples of scientists, do for how the students picture scientists? I’ll let a selection of drawings from that same classroom in North Carolina tell that tale. Well before my visit, Eura Lawrence had this same set of sixth-grade students I met with draw what a scientist looks like, and the pictures below are just some of what they came up with (even before my visit!).

I wanted to let others know about the North Carolina Science Festival’s Invite-a-Scientist Program. But then I thought, “What about all the other states?” I know of some other examples, including the STEM Mentoring Café, where female federal-agency scientists met with small groups of middle-school girls in Washington, D.C. And I thought, “I’m sure there are other examples in other states that I don’t know about,” so if you know about a program in your state, please tell us about it in a comments and help spread the word!

If you are interested in the North Carolina Science Festival Invite-a-Scientist Program, their goal is to have 75 experts involved next year! Applications for next year’s festival will open Aug. 11! You can register here.

And here’s a list of other opportunities to get us started. Add a comment if you know about a program in your state coming up this school year.

Georgia: 
Atlanta Science Festival

North Carolina
North Carolina Science Festival
DNA Day

Washington, D.C.
STEM Mentoring Café
USA Science Festival

Canada 
Scientists in Schools

And, of course, here are the lovely drawings of “what a scientist looks like” by the students at Beaufort Middle School:

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_57.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_55.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_07.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_01.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_51.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_47.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_43.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_09.jpg

2014-08-07-201405271259_Page_03.jpg

  #women in science    #science    #kids    #schema  
scienceyoucanlove:

Violinist plays during brain surgeryMusician Roger Frisch underwent deep brain stimulation to fix tremors in his hands and played the violin throughout the process.http://bit.ly/1m453IuSource ScienceAlert through Daily Anatomy

scienceyoucanlove:

Violinist plays during brain surgery
Musician Roger Frisch underwent deep brain stimulation to fix tremors in his hands and played the violin throughout the process.
http://bit.ly/1m453Iu
Source ScienceAlert through Daily Anatomy

  #cool