zeldathemes
scigrrrl

Welcome to the blog extension of the scigrrrl zine series! This blog (and the zine) includes everything under the umbrella of feminist science studies (aka where my love for both feminism and science intersects). Feedback, constructive criticism, and questions are greatly appreciated!
DNA is like a computer program but far, far more advanced than any software ever created.


Bill Gates, The Road Ahead. Bill Gates visits BBSRC investment http://bit.ly/1u6m89y

(via bbsrc)

currentsinbiology:

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that could add a new and unpredictable element to the region. A University of Washington researcher made the first study of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean, and detected house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. The results were recently published in Geophysical Research Letters.

"As the Arctic is melting, it’s a pretty simple prediction that the additional open water should make waves," said lead author Jim Thomson, an oceanographer with the UW Applied Physics Laboratory.

currentsinbiology:

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that could add a new and unpredictable element to the region. A University of Washington researcher made the first study of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean, and detected house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. The results were recently published in Geophysical Research Letters.

"As the Arctic is melting, it’s a pretty simple prediction that the additional open water should make waves," said lead author Jim Thomson, an oceanographer with the UW Applied Physics Laboratory.

thatscienceguy:

The Venezuelan Poodle Moth was only recently discovered and identified as a species of moth in 2009.

CPR and AED certified!

For my new job I had to get safety certifications. (CPR certification is a lot easier than I thought it would be). There were about five employees in the class and we each had a simulation dummy to learn on - male typical manikin that would click on accurate compressions and whose chest would rise when given a breath. It was really cool. Coming out of the class I feel prepared to do CPR as needed, but do I think I could give CPR to a female? Definitely not as confident. After we passed our tests our instructor gave us a quick line about CPR on females that I am pretty sure I was the only one to catch (the shirt and bra need to come off as If AED is needed, no metal should obstruct the shock- I also imagine with breasts, especially larger breasts, compressions would be more difficult).

I would be helpful to have female dummies as well to practice on! Why don’t we? Is it because a bare chested female has become so sexualized? Is it something culturally that tells us this would be inappropriate for a training (which would involve touching the breast)? It also scares me that CPR is something you decide whether or not you feel comfortable performing - because I am less confident performing it on a female (and others are likely to be too due to lack of experience, even if just on a dummy), would people be less willing to give a women CPR? Would I be?

  #CPR    #CPR on a female    #training    #thoughts    #personal    #reflection  
  #depression    #brain  
vintagesevensisters:


Florence N’gendo Mwangi (Smith ‘61), the first international student from Africa to attend Smith and the namesake of the Mwangi Cultural Center, pictured with classmates circa 1961.

vintagesevensisters:

Florence N’gendo Mwangi (Smith ‘61), the first international student from Africa to attend Smith and the namesake of the Mwangi Cultural Center, pictured with classmates circa 1961.
mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014
We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.
Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.
That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome Research. The previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems
In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.
While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102
"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."
English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems

In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.

While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102

"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."

English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

compoundchem:

It’s National Tequila Day in the US today! Check out this graphic from Reactions to learn about the chemistry of tequila - and how scientists have found a way to turn tequila into diamonds.

compoundchem:

It’s National Tequila Day in the US today! Check out this graphic from Reactions to learn about the chemistry of tequila - and how scientists have found a way to turn tequila into diamonds.

thegreenwolf:

Sir David Attenborough will always be one of my heroes.

thegreenwolf:

Sir David Attenborough will always be one of my heroes.