zeldathemes
scigrrrl

Welcome to the blog extension of the scigrrrl zine series! This blog (and the zine) includes everything under the umbrella of feminist science studies (aka where my love for both feminism and science intersects). Feedback, constructive criticism, and questions are greatly appreciated!
anthrocentric:

Grandma’s Experiences Leave a Mark on Your GenesYour ancestors’ lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.

Darwin and Freud walk into a bar. Two alcoholic mice — a mother and her son — sit on two bar stools, lapping gin from two thimbles.
The mother mouse looks up and says, “Hey, geniuses, tell me how my son got into this sorry state.”
“Bad inheritance,” says Darwin.
“Bad mothering,” says Freud.
For over a hundred years, those two views — nature or nurture, biology or psychology — offered opposing explanations for how behaviors develop and persist, not only within a single individual but across generations.
And then, in 1992, two young scientists following in Freud’s and Darwin’s footsteps actually did walk into a bar. And by the time they walked out, a few beers later, they had begun to forge a revolutionary new synthesis of how life experiences could directly affect your genes — and not only your own life experiences, but those of your mother’s, grandmother’s and beyond.
The bar was in Madrid, where the Cajal Institute, Spain’s oldest academic center for the study of neurobiology, was holding an international meeting. Moshe Szyf, a molecular biologist and geneticist at McGill University in Montreal, had never studied psychology or neurology, but he had been talked into attending by a colleague who thought his work might have some application. Likewise, Michael Meaney, a McGill neurobiologist, had been talked into attending by the same colleague, who thought Meaney’s research into animal models of maternal neglect might benefit from Szyf’s perspective.
[read more]

anthrocentric:

Grandma’s Experiences Leave a Mark on Your Genes
Your ancestors’ lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.

Darwin and Freud walk into a bar. Two alcoholic mice — a mother and her son — sit on two bar stools, lapping gin from two thimbles.

The mother mouse looks up and says, “Hey, geniuses, tell me how my son got into this sorry state.”

“Bad inheritance,” says Darwin.

“Bad mothering,” says Freud.

For over a hundred years, those two views — nature or nurture, biology or psychology — offered opposing explanations for how behaviors develop and persist, not only within a single individual but across generations.

And then, in 1992, two young scientists following in Freud’s and Darwin’s footsteps actually did walk into a bar. And by the time they walked out, a few beers later, they had begun to forge a revolutionary new synthesis of how life experiences could directly affect your genes — and not only your own life experiences, but those of your mother’s, grandmother’s and beyond.

The bar was in Madrid, where the Cajal Institute, Spain’s oldest academic center for the study of neurobiology, was holding an international meeting. Moshe Szyf, a molecular biologist and geneticist at McGill University in Montreal, had never studied psychology or neurology, but he had been talked into attending by a colleague who thought his work might have some application. Likewise, Michael Meaney, a McGill neurobiologist, had been talked into attending by the same colleague, who thought Meaney’s research into animal models of maternal neglect might benefit from Szyf’s perspective.

[read more]

astro-feminist:

"I haven’t always been an advocate for “women’s issues” in academia.  I have distinct [not-so-distant] memories of rolling my eyes when hearing about ‘diversity workshops’ or scholarship/fellowship opportunities only available to women or men of color or white women.  I thought we were beyond this. I thought the playing field was leveled.  I even thought such `nonsense’ did a disservice to underrepresented groups in science by unnecessarily reminding them of their uphill battle and struggles of the past.  And then I had a major wake up call.

“Wake up call” isn’t really the right term. I didn’t suddenly wake up one day and see that I lived in a world different to the one I knew growing up. “Waking up” took years of thought, questioning, self-doubt, and help from colleagues and friends, but it eventually happened.  I woke up to a world where I had been a reluctant recipient of sexual harassment and hated my job as a result.  It was a job I had once loved and invested so much in.  I was depressed, isolated and ready to quit. I blamed myself and my incompetence for a whole lot of strange, uncomfortable interactions with colleagues. 
  #astronmy    #women    #sexual harassment    #raising our voices to be heard  
scienceyoucanlove:

Pic of the Day: Beautiful scanning electron microscopy images from www.eyeofscience.de<http://www.eyeofscience.de/>"For 2 decades we have been devoting our work to the visualization of the previously unknown and invisible. Detailed, aesthetic, and scientifically correct we present an access into the microscopic world of biology, medicine, chemistry, technology, and our environment. Photo design for science. Micro-photography for advertising. Microscopy for education.Scientific photography has many fields. We have dedicated our focus, energy, and time on micro photography. Here, we set new standards in the creation of images from a scanning electron microscope which the scientific observer as well as the seeker for aesthetic pictures will keep in mind.Of course, the electron microscope images fulfill the high technical demands for ed
read more from American Society for Microbiology

scienceyoucanlove:

Pic of the Day: Beautiful scanning electron microscopy images from www.eyeofscience.de<http://www.eyeofscience.de/>

"For 2 decades we have been devoting our work to the visualization of the previously unknown and invisible. Detailed, aesthetic, and scientifically correct we present an access into the microscopic world of biology, medicine, chemistry, technology, and our environment. Photo design for science. Micro-photography for advertising. Microscopy for education.

Scientific photography has many fields. We have dedicated our focus, energy, and time on micro photography. Here, we set new standards in the creation of images from a scanning electron microscope which the scientific observer as well as the seeker for aesthetic pictures will keep in mind.
Of course, the electron microscope images fulfill the high technical demands for ed

read more from American Society for Microbiology

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

Even when I was explicitly trying, I still failed to have the discussion participants fairly represent the population of the students in my classroom.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it’s called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are ‘hogging the floor’ even when men are dominating.

onlinecounsellingcollege:

Ignore those who say that they never feel down. We’re surrounded by messages on positive thinking because so many battle with discouragement. So what can you do when you’re living in a cloud, and everything seems pointless and negative?

1. Ask someone you respect if…

She as the normative subject

I love that my physics/stats books use she as the normative subject! Seeing she instead if he still in texts still shocked me though. How many times must I read such text for the use of she to feel as normal as the use of he in these texts????

  #personal    #normative subject  

shychemist:

scientific-women:

engrprof:

thegrapesofangst:

I made these for you! So this is my Science Follow Forever, just to thank all the science related blogs who have followed me or who I follow and who have taught me something I didn’t know, made me laugh with an amazing pun, or inspired me. 

adventuresinchemistry, biomedicalephemera, butylenemaid, chemistryandstuff, chroniclesofachemist, dumb-science-jokeseatgeekstudy, economicsofcuriosity, en-thalpy, engrprof, entrop-eghostly-smoke, just-chemistry-things,m3rcaptan, markruffalo, neuralcaffeinology, neurosciencestuff, passthecholoformscientific-women, shrat, shychemist, sweetteascience

Thank you everyone! I’ll be doing a non science one soon, as well!

This is awesome!
First time I’ve been in someone’s follow forever! I love these quotes and your blog!

Thank you!  How wonderful!

Thank you! :’)

romeitoiumono:

…don’t ever forget that!

And don’t say "I’ll never be good". You can become better! and one day you’ll wake up and you’ll find out how good you actually became.

「Neil deGrasse Tyson」

trustmeiamascientist:

Your digestive tract is really just a long tube with two openings that lead to the outside (the mouth and, ahem, the anus). You don’t have to dissect any bodily tissues to get to food digesting inside your stomach or intestines. If you image yourself to be a kind of huge, biological donut, your…

micdotcom:

Whoa, it turns out Stonehenge is much, much bigger than we originally thought

Archaeologists working on the University of Birmingham’s Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project made the discovery after mapping the area using sophisticated surveying tools, including remote sensing techniques. 

These devices allowed them to see the grounds underneath and around Stonehenge, and what they found is nothing short of amazing: a veritable landscape of structures.

It’s part of a whole network of monuments | Follow micdotcom